Posts tagged education

1 Notes


[Frances Glasner] Lee felt that more was needed to teach students the emerging art of evidence gathering. It was impossible to bring them to crime scenes, so Lee decided to create her own miniature crime scenes to use for training. She called her creations the Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death. “She came up with this idea, and then co-opted the feminine tradition of miniature-making to advance in this male-dominated field,” says Corinne May Botz, an artist and author of The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death. “Like Sherlock Holmes, she was setting a scene and creating something like a character study of the victims, and she went about doing this very much from a detached investigator’s point of view.”
The 20 models Lee created were based on actual crime scenes, and she chose only the most puzzling cases in order to test aspiring detectives’ powers of observation and logic.


-"Murder in Miniature :One woman’s ghastly dollhouse dioramas turned crime scene investigation into a science" by Rachel Nuwer at Slate

[Frances Glasner] Lee felt that more was needed to teach students the emerging art of evidence gathering. It was impossible to bring them to crime scenes, so Lee decided to create her own miniature crime scenes to use for training. She called her creations the Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death. “She came up with this idea, and then co-opted the feminine tradition of miniature-making to advance in this male-dominated field,” says Corinne May Botz, an artist and author of The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death. “Like Sherlock Holmes, she was setting a scene and creating something like a character study of the victims, and she went about doing this very much from a detached investigator’s point of view.”

The 20 models Lee created were based on actual crime scenes, and she chose only the most puzzling cases in order to test aspiring detectives’ powers of observation and logic.

-"Murder in Miniature :One woman’s ghastly dollhouse dioramas turned crime scene investigation into a science" by Rachel Nuwer at Slate

6 Notes

Today’s version of segregation is enforced not through “whites only” signage or a governor blocking the schoolhouse door, but through disparate property-tax bases. Wealthy homeowners fund their own affluent school districts while poor homeowners try, and fail, to fund schools for poor children with the greatest needs. That’s why advocates are now focused on addressing the divided neighborhoods at the root of the education divide, fighting to bring economic and racial diversity to affluent suburbs that fortify the walls of the ghetto by prohibiting affordable housing.
The Resegregation of American Schools by Daniel Denvir at Al Jazeera

5 Notes

Thanks to all of those extended appreciation to teachers this week.
Ultimately, though, I think we’d rather be paid a salary that showed that appreciation.

Thanks to all of those extended appreciation to teachers this week.

Ultimately, though, I think we’d rather be paid a salary that showed that appreciation.

Notes


"When we undervalue a profession, we also tell the next generation of bright educators they shouldn’t bother teaching—or that if they do, they must take a vow of poverty. And students pay a price: Teachers who spend nights and weekends working other jobs cannot possibly devote the necessary attention to their students or lesson plans. Even worse, talented college students who are passionate about teaching, but seeking a stable future, opt out before they even begin. No teacher should have a second job and teachers should struggle less financially so they can focus on their critical work in the classroom." 

"Why Teachers Salaries Should Be Doubled - Now" by Valarie Strauss at The Washington Post

"When we undervalue a profession, we also tell the next generation of bright educators they shouldn’t bother teaching—or that if they do, they must take a vow of poverty. And students pay a price: Teachers who spend nights and weekends working other jobs cannot possibly devote the necessary attention to their students or lesson plans. Even worse, talented college students who are passionate about teaching, but seeking a stable future, opt out before they even begin. No teacher should have a second job and teachers should struggle less financially so they can focus on their critical work in the classroom." 

"Why Teachers Salaries Should Be Doubled - Now" by Valarie Strauss at The Washington Post

Notes

This is a troubling trend to an experienced educator like Gerzon, who knows how much a child can soak up in the right environment. After years of study and practice, she’ll tell you that 5-year-olds don’t learn by listening to a rote lesson, their bottoms on their chairs. They learn through experience. They learn through play. Yet there is a growing disconnect between what the research says is best for children — a classroom free of pressure — and what’s actually going on in schools.
from Pressure-cooker kindergarten by Patti Hartigan at Boston.com

Notes

The so-called school reform movement declares that public education has failed American students. But in reality, it is the policies of brutal austerity, relentless standardized testing, and teacher bashing that ensure failure – and promote privatization as the only solution. And so the beast is starved: fewer resources, fewer teachers, fewer aides to make schools safe and a worse education. Better yet, the more teachers employed in typically non-union charters, the weaker the political movement to defend public schools.

Federal and state cuts have also redistributed the burden of funding education from the state to local governments, a sharply regressive move that forces the poorest school districts to raise taxes on poor residents who can least afford to pay.

Meanwhile, Wall Street profits are up, in some part thanks to millions in transfers from broke school districts and local governments. In Philadelphia, the school district has lost $161m to interest-rate swap deals signed with Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs and Wells Fargo. They went sour after the very same banks pushed the economy into oblivion. As a result, the cash-strapped schools must borrow more money from, well, the banks.

From “The solution to US public schools is not corporate America" by Dan Denvir at The Guardian 

 

2 Notes

With regard to my profession, I have truly attempted to live John Dewey’s famous quotation (now likely cliché with me, I’ve used it so very often) that “Education is not preparation for life, education is life itself.” This type of total immersion is what I have always referred to as teaching “heavy,” working hard, spending time, researching, attending to details and never feeling satisfied that I knew enough on any topic. I now find that this approach to my professio n is not only devalued, but denigrated and perhaps, in some quarters despised.

-letter of resignation from Jerry Conti, veteran teacher, to the Westhill School District in Syracuse New York

Syracuse.com reports:

In what he calls a “ sad long letter,” Conti, 62, notified the Westhill School District last month that he will retire when the school year ends. Conti said he’s leaving two years before he is eligible for a full 30-year pension, because he can no longer stomach what’s going on with the educational system.

“This whole thing is being driven by people who know nothing about education,” Conti said today.”It’s sad.”

5 Notes

3 Notes

Helen Keller worked throughout her long life to achieve social justice; she was an integral part of many social movements in the 20th century. Yet today, she is remembered chiefly as a child who overcame the obstacles of being deaf and blind largely through the efforts of her teacher, Annie Sullivan. While she may be hailed as a “hero” in lesson plans for today’s children, the books recount only a fraction of what makes Helen Keller heroic.
from Who Stole Helen Keller By Ruth Shagoury

Notes

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Great segment from the Melissa Harris-Perry show about education reform and segregation.