1 Notes

5 Notes

I am deeply in love with this “library card art” series from WingedWorld at Etsy

I am deeply in love with this “library card art” series from WingedWorld at Etsy

5 Notes

Derrick Gordon, a sophomore starter for the University of Massachusetts men’s basketball team, stepped forward Wednesday as the first openly gay player in Division I men’s college basketball, sharing his story with ESPN and Outsports.

Times, they are a-changing.

I’m excited.

Notes

LGBT activist Kirill Fedorov was violently assaulted by anti-gay protesters during the St. Petersburg gay pride rally in June. He was later arrested.
Photo by Mads Nissen featured in “From Russia With Love: Photos of Brave Gay Activists Fighting Homophobia" at MotherJones

LGBT activist Kirill Fedorov was violently assaulted by anti-gay protesters during the St. Petersburg gay pride rally in June. He was later arrested.

Photo by Mads Nissen featured in “From Russia With Love: Photos of Brave Gay Activists Fighting Homophobia" at MotherJones

Notes

We've Never Stopped Thinking About Kurt Cobain

Here’s NPR’s tribute to Kurt today.

4 Notes

Twenty years ago, I was in 5th grade in a suburb of St. Louis, MO.
I knew about Kurt Cobain because my dad is into music.  When he bought our first CD player, he bought two CDs to play in it.  One was Green Day’s “Dookie”.  The other was Nirvana’s “MTV Unplugged in New York”.  When I’ve asked him about those choices, he said he was interested in the evolution of punk.
We listened to both of those albums a lot. They were added to the regular rotation of shared music in my household that also included The Beatles, Bonnie Rait, Hall & Oates, The B-52s, Elvis Costello, The Talking Heads, Blondie, and Eric Clapton.
I quickly learned more Nirvana.  My friend Jody had an older brother who was into grunge rock and Jody and I used to trek to the record store in town to buy cassette tape singles of bands he suggested. My friend Lauren and I bought In Utero on CD.  I started listening to the radio in a different way.  My sister and I used to prefer the local Oldies station but that year we started tuning in to 105.7, “The Point”, the first full-time alternative rock station in St. Louis.  Grunge rock — alternative rock — was the first music that felt like it belonged to me.  Like I discovered it. Like the musicians had created it for me.
I was 11.  I wanted to marry Kurt Cobain when I grew up.  I thought his ripped jeans and flannels were dreamy. I loved the way his voice sounded like soft sandpaper on the unplugged album.  I loved how raw and loud he was belting out the chorus of “Lithium”.  I thought he looked fragile and rough at the same time and I thought that was exciting.
20 years ago today, Kurt Cobain killed himself.  A few months later, two little girls in the St. Louis area were kidnapped and killed.  My child’s mind wove these events together.  It is how I know the world is not a safe place.
I kept growing up.  I never stopped loving Nirvana.  If anything, my appreciation for Kurt Cobain and his legacy increased.  In middle school, I hung posters of him on my wall.  In high school, I played “Smells Like Teen Spirit” on repeat.  My heart still soars every time I hear its opening chords.  In college, I bought copies of Kurt’s journals as soon as they were published and swooned over the intimate stories he told about my new idols, the Riot Grrls.
I miss you, Kurt Cobain.  I wish you had lived long enough to fade away.

Twenty years ago, I was in 5th grade in a suburb of St. Louis, MO.

I knew about Kurt Cobain because my dad is into music.  When he bought our first CD player, he bought two CDs to play in it.  One was Green Day’s “Dookie”.  The other was Nirvana’s “MTV Unplugged in New York”.  When I’ve asked him about those choices, he said he was interested in the evolution of punk.

We listened to both of those albums a lot. They were added to the regular rotation of shared music in my household that also included The Beatles, Bonnie Rait, Hall & Oates, The B-52s, Elvis Costello, The Talking Heads, Blondie, and Eric Clapton.

I quickly learned more Nirvana.  My friend Jody had an older brother who was into grunge rock and Jody and I used to trek to the record store in town to buy cassette tape singles of bands he suggested. My friend Lauren and I bought In Utero on CD.  I started listening to the radio in a different way.  My sister and I used to prefer the local Oldies station but that year we started tuning in to 105.7, “The Point”, the first full-time alternative rock station in St. Louis.  Grunge rock — alternative rock — was the first music that felt like it belonged to me.  Like I discovered it. Like the musicians had created it for me.

I was 11.  I wanted to marry Kurt Cobain when I grew up.  I thought his ripped jeans and flannels were dreamy. I loved the way his voice sounded like soft sandpaper on the unplugged album.  I loved how raw and loud he was belting out the chorus of “Lithium”.  I thought he looked fragile and rough at the same time and I thought that was exciting.

20 years ago today, Kurt Cobain killed himself.  A few months later, two little girls in the St. Louis area were kidnapped and killed.  My child’s mind wove these events together.  It is how I know the world is not a safe place.

I kept growing up.  I never stopped loving Nirvana.  If anything, my appreciation for Kurt Cobain and his legacy increased.  In middle school, I hung posters of him on my wall.  In high school, I played “Smells Like Teen Spirit” on repeat.  My heart still soars every time I hear its opening chords.  In college, I bought copies of Kurt’s journals as soon as they were published and swooned over the intimate stories he told about my new idols, the Riot Grrls.

I miss you, Kurt Cobain.  I wish you had lived long enough to fade away.

2 Notes

Well.  I could go for some Teddy Grahams. 

2 Notes

Surprisingly similar to the way that I imagine the police.

2 Notes

Just discovered Twisted Doodles.  Love it.

Just discovered Twisted Doodles.  Love it.

Notes

open letters

Dear misogynist mainstream hip-hop music,

You suck.  But thanks for the awesome beats - totally made my run more fun.

Superman that ho,

Martha

Dear Other Visitors to Prospect Park,

What? You’ve never seen someone compelled to dance while also running? 

Crazy right here,

Martha

Dear 30 Minute 5K,

I can see you from here. I’m coming to get you.

Look out,

Martha